claim


claim
claim vb *demand, exact, require
Analogous words: *maintain, assert, defend, vindicate, justify: allege, *adduce, advance
Antonyms: disclaim: renounce
Contrasted words: disavow, disown, dis- acknowledge (see affirmative verbs at ACKNOWLEDGE): reject, repudiate, refuse (see DECLINE vb): concede, allow, *grant: waive, cede, *relinquish: *forgo, abnegate
claim n Claim, title, pretension, pretense are comparable when they denote an actual or alleged right to demand something as one's possession, quality, power, or prerogative.
Claim carries the strongest implication of any of these terms of a demand for recognition; only the context can indicate whether that demand is regarded as justifiable or not or whether the right is actually asserted by the person involved
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though the house was legally the daughter's, the father, as the one who had paid for it and had taken care of all taxes and insurance, had a moral claim to live there the rest of his life

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intelligent persons cannot accept the claims made for many patent medicines

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he advanced no claim to scholarly knowledge

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searching for truth as against all the claims and all the counterclaims of all the partisans— Lippmann

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liberty itself became ... a principle of anarchy rather than a body of claims to be read in the context of the social process— Laski

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Claim also occurs in a more concrete sense as denoting the property or possession for which one sets up a claim
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stake out a claim in an oil field

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Title (see also NAME), on the other hand, distinctively imputes validity or justice to the claim, or its substantiation in law or in reason
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his distinguished success as the governor of a great state gives him a title to our support of his candidacy for president

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many of the people who masquerade under the name of "men of science" have no sort of title to that name— Ellis

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they were discussed by men each of whom, in his own way, had some title to speak on them— Sat. Review

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Pretension (see also PRETENSE, AMBITION) is sometimes used in place of claim
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gifts and excellences to which Wordsworth can make no pretensionArnold

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and less often, in place of title
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the courtier, the trader, and the scholar, should all have an equal pretension to the denomination of a gentleman— Steele

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Very often, however, pretension connotes a lack of warrant or a weakness in the claim and may attribute to it a measure of hypocrisy or deceit
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this court disclaims all pretensions to such power— John Marshall

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his pretension, deftly circulated by press agents, was that he was a man of brilliant and polished mind— Mencken

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Pretense has become rare in the sense of claim (see PRETENSE). Usually the term applies to an asserted claim
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Marlborough calmly and politely showed that the pretense was unreasonable— Macaulay

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but it may apply to a claim that is tacitly made in that one is assumed by another to be something that one is not or to have a right that one does not actually possess
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she knew that she was in the house under false pretenses, for her host and hostess had warmly welcomed her as a daughter of old friends of the same name

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Analogous words: assertion, affirmation, protestation, declaration (see corresponding verbs at ASSERT): *right, prerogative, birthright, privilege

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • claim — n [Old French, from clamer to call, claim, from Latin clamare to shout, proclaim] 1 a: a demand for something (as money) due or believed to be due; specif: a demand for a benefit (as under the workers compensation law) or contractual payment (as… …   Law dictionary

  • claim — A right to payment (SA Bankruptcy.com) A right to payment, whether or not fixed, contingent, liquidated, disputed, or matured. (Bernstein s Dictionary of Bankruptcy Terminology) BAR DATE The date by which claims must be filed with the Bankruptcy… …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • Claim — Claim, n. [Of. claim cry, complaint, from clamer. See {Claim}, v. t.] 1. A demand of a right or supposed right; a calling on another for something due or supposed to be due; an assertion of a right or fact. [1913 Webster] 2. A right to claim or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Claim — may refer to: Claim (legal) Claim (patent) Land claim Proposition, a statement which is either true or false A right Sequent, in mathematics A main contention, see conclusion of law This disambiguation page lists articles associ …   Wikipedia

  • Claim — Claim, v. i. To be entitled to anything; to deduce a right or title; to have a claim. [1913 Webster] We must know how the first ruler, from whom any one claims, came by his authority. Locke. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Claim — (Englisch Behauptung, Anspruch) bezeichnet: im angelsächsischen Raum im Rechtswesen einen Anspruch im angelsächsischen Raum einen Rechtstitel auf Grundbesitz, siehe Claim (Grundbesitz) einen Begriff aus dem Marketing, siehe Claim (Werbung) als… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Claim — (kl[=a]m), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Claimed} (kl[=a]md); p. pr. & vb. n. {Claiming}.] [OE. clamen, claimen, OF. clamer, fr. L. clamare to cry out, call; akin to calare to proclaim, Gr. kalei^n to call, Skr. kal to sound, G. holen to fetch, E. hale… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • claim — ● claim nom masculin (anglais claim, titre) Titre de propriété minière, conférant le droit d exploiter sur une superficie déterminée. Terrain renfermant du minerai (or, diamant, uranium) …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Claim — (engl., spr. klēm), »Anspruch«, insbes. Goldgräberparzelle, Mutung …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Claim — (engl., spr. klehm), Anspruch, Besitztitel; erworbenes Stück Land, Anteil an einer Goldgräberei …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • claim — ▪ I. claim claim 1 [kleɪm] noun [countable] 1. COMMERCE a request or demand for money, or the amount of money asked for: • The developer made a claim against the owner for extra building costs. • There were very large claims for loss of earnings …   Financial and business terms


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